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Thank You...A Million Times Over

June 29, 2016
I just got out of the hospital after being in one for 55 days. It was scarier than anything I've ever dealt with before. Not having control of my body and being in severe pain was terrifying, but I was able to get through the worst of it because of all of the amazing support I received. I cannot believe how much people went out of their way to help me. My students' parents really surprised me. I knew that they liked me, but I am utterly blown away by how much they have done and continue to do for me. We haven't even received final confirmation of which classes we will teach next year, so they've done what they have without even knowing if I will be their child's teacher again. Other teachers at my school also stepped up and helped me time and time again. Some teachers I barely even knew visited me and kept me company in the hospital. That really meant a lot to me because I needed visitors to distract myself and to keep my spirits up.

Getting through the rest of my recovery will not be easy. I wanted to write this post to remind myself how lucky I am and how people really do care.


* Like I said, I was in the hospital for 55 days. That is a long period of time, but crazily enough, I had a visitor or group of visitors almost every single day, and I didn't expect that. Of course my close friends visited several times, but I made some new friends out of this experience. I looked forward to receiving guests each evening. It was truly the best part of my day because I could speak in English and just talk about other things besides my back problems. Also, being in a Chinese hospital for that long had its own set of challenges. It was nice to have other foreigners empathize with my situation and help me deal with culture shock.

* My friends and acquaintances helped utilize their connections so that I could get second opinions about my condition. Three of my friends have mothers who are nurses, so I would send them pictures and relay what the doctors at the hospital told me. It felt good to have their input because I don't have a medical background, not to mention the slightest clue if what I was being told was legitimate. A student's mom helped me in this respect because she used to be a nurse in one of the top hospitals in Shanghai, and my friend's fiancee (a practicing doctor in Shanghai) took a look at the wound on my back when I was having a complication. Hearing from others really put me at ease, but it also helped me know which specific questions I should ask the doctors concerning my recovery.

* My school supported me by finding a replacement for me. At first, I was getting asked a lot of questions about my class. It's not that I didn't want to help because of course I did, but I was just in so much pain and very worried about my situation. In the hierarchy of needs, my health had to come first. It was a relief to know that my class had a long-term substitute and that the other first grade teachers were helping him manage the responsibilities. I could relax a bit knowing that my class was being taken care of.

* During my stay at the hospital, I had three main doctors, a surgeon, and a wound specialist. One of the doctors gave me his personal phone number and said I could message him with any concerns or questions. I'm not sure if he did this out of the goodness of his heart or if he was told to do this, but I'd like to think it was the former. Regardless, having his personal number helped me immensely. I only got to see my doctors for a short period of time each day, but I would think of questions later on in the day, so it was great to be able to communicate with someone and get answers to what I had asked. That doctor also had to talk to my bosses at my school and explain about my condition to them in Chinese. Another thing he is currently doing is that he is cleaning my wound for me once a week for free. Again, I think he might just be doing that to help me out so that I don't have to wait in a long line in the outpatient building.

* I need to give a big thanks to Rachael. Who would have ever thought that a blogging friend would eventually be a person kind of in charge of my life?  Before I had the surgery, the doctors made a big deal about finding someone to sign for me. By sign for me, I mean that this person would be the one making the calls if something were to go wrong during my surgery since I was going to be put under and couldn't speak for myself. At first they weren't going to let a non-Chinese person do it, and they tried to encourage me to get one of my bosses from my school to sign. The bosses at my school did not want to do it, nor did I really want them to, so eventually they agreed to let Rachael be in charge. She had to get my parents' phone number and get in contact with them if there was a decision to be made. The surgery was invasive, and thank goodness nothing went wrong, but I'm glad I had a plan in place just in case.  Rachael also was the only friend to stay overnight a few times in the hospital. This girl is a true friend--she even put lotion on my dry, cracked feet. If that's not love, I don't know what is!


* Rachael also started a fund for me by messaging the other teachers in the primary and middle school about my situation. I get very weird and embarrassed about this type of thing, but Rachael knew me well enough not to ask my permission and just went for it. If she had asked me, I would have said no, but in the end I was glad to have some cash to help pay for food. I also had some money leftover to go towards the cost of the ayi who took care of me. Sometimes I'm guilty of not letting people help me when they WANT to help because I feel bad, so it was a good thing that Rachael took matters into her own hands.

* My Chinese co-teacher has also been a God-send. She sent me adorable video messages from my students, gave me a card from the class, and visited me in the hospital every Sunday. She helped me out by taking my bank card to the finance office so that we could pay my hospital fee. I couldn't physically walk to the office myself, and I sent two of my American friends, but they were gone for an hour and fifteen minutes and came back muddled and frustrated without having paid the fee. It's not their fault--it was a complicated process even for someone who spoke Mandarin! Thank goodness my co-teacher took care of that for me because I was getting really sick of hearing that I owed money 10 times a day. Now that I've been discharged, she has also been helping me get to and from the hospital so that I can get my wound cleaned.

* I put my close friend Scott to work. He did a lot of the "behind the scenes" stuff for me. I felt like I made him my personal assistant, and he told me it was fun--like a scavenger hunt. He packed clothes for me to wear in the hospital, did my laundry, cleaned my apartment, got me reading material, returned my library books, and fetched items from my classroom that I needed. He had to go to the bank for me several times to help wire RMB into my account so that I could pay for everything. The most important thing he did for me was to get my new room ready for me. I'm not currently in my regular apartment, so he moved down towels, toiletries, a water dispenser, clothes, and other personal items. I'm sure this took him hours, and I really am so grateful. Scott was also super understanding when we had to cancel all of our summer travel plans, and the best part is that I told him to find another travel buddy to go on our trips with, but instead he is waiting for me to heal so that we can go together next summer.

* One of my bosses did a lot for me, too. He helped secure a bed for me in "one of the best hospitals in all of China." I guess it took him multiple trips and almost his entire weekend. He gave me permission to stay on a first floor apartment since I live on the top floor of an apartment with no elevator and cannot get to the top floor on my own yet. He had to visit the hospital and talk to the doctors about my condition and was in charge of getting all the paperwork for my insurance. Trust me, there was quite a lot of it. He was able to get my medicine and answered hundreds of my questions.

* My surgery and hospital stay ended up costing about $30,000 USD. I had to pay for everything up front and did not have the money. If it weren't for my dad, I wouldn't have been able to cover the costs, and I don't know what I would have done. Yes, I will get about half of that money back from my insurance, but it's really scary to think about what might have happened if I did not have his financial support. Of course, I'm going to pay him back, but I think I'm more worried about that than he is. In addition to my dad's support, the director of the primary school got permission to give me the leftover Charity Fair money to help defray the costs of my surgery. That's exceptionally good news for me because I'll be receiving almost $5,000, which leaves me just owing about $10,000 of my own money. Since I wasn't able to work and have not gotten paid for several months that will be the money I'll be using to survive on over the summer.


* Some of my friends back home offered to take care of me all summer if I could fly back to the States. A few of my friends even downloaded We Chat so that we could talk. We have been messaging ever since, and even though they can't be here to help me, it is helping me knowing that they care!

* Other friends that work with me in China have really been there for me as well. They brought me meals, kept me company, messaged me throughout the day, gave me reading material and DVDs as well as useful items that I needed and didn't have. My friends washed my hair, helped organize my room, picked up groceries for me, and massaged my legs so that I wouldn't get a blood clot after the surgery. One friend even offered to buy a flight home for me on a plane that has a bed in it. A different friend helped me get the back brace I am required to wear each time I stand up for at least the next three months. Two friends helped pack up all of my belongings and busted me out of the hospital and then helped me settle in. Another girl bought me some makeup, just to cheer me up. I could go on and on.

* My liaison is seriously the best. She backed me up ten fold and explained to my bosses why certain things that went on at the hospital really upset me. This wonderful person fought to try to get me my full bonus even though I missed some work, and she just had my best interests in mind. She even found me some crutches to use for when I start walking around again and gave me some perfume she wasn't going to take back to the UK with her because she knows I can't take a shower for another month. I know that I am very fortunate to have a person like my liaison looking out for me.

* My students' parents also went above and beyond anything I ever expected. They found ways to help me when I didn't even ask them for help. They gave me fruit baskets and flowers and sent me encouraging e-mails telling me that I was not alone. Several parents visited me in the hospital and some of them even brought my students. One of my student's parents sent me a get well song that his son made for me that had me tearing up. A student's mom had her ayi bring me meals three times a week in the hospital. My co-teacher told me that one of moms even offered to let me live in her house over the summer so that her ayi could care for me. My students' parents have been helping me get to the hospital and were going to try to find a college student to help me over the summer.

* Also, thanks to all of you guys for your sweet blog comments, tweets, and get well wishes on Instagram. It's nice to think that I had so many good vibes being sent my way from all over the world.

As you can see, this whole ordeal has been rough for me, but my goodness... I have some kind-hearted people in my life. I will never, ever forget what they have done for me and hope that when I am well again that someday I can pay it forward. 

How have people in your life surprised you in a good way?

Changing as a Traveler: 20's to 30's

June 27, 2016

I don't know about you, but there are some parts of my personality that have changed (for the better!) as I grew older. I know it's cliche, but I do feel like I learned many important lessons in my 20's that have made me both stronger and wiser. If a problem arises now, I handle it differently than I would have back then. There are also activities that I would have enjoyed in my 20's that I steer clear from now. Wait...that sounds a little shady, but I don't mean to be. I guess I'm trying to say that I'm a little more tame than I was in my 20's. Just as I've changed in my every day life, I feel as if I've also changed as a traveler over the years.

* My overall travel style is not quite the same. When I was younger, I knew exactly how many countries I had been to and wanted to go to as many different countries as possible. If I throughly enjoyed a weekend trip to...say Brussels, I wouldn't have revisited it in hopes of going to another city in a completely different country. Instead of trying to jump from country to country, I like to take things a little bit slower these days and spend additional time in an area so that I can explore it more thoroughly. And, now if I fall in love with a place, I have no qualms about going back time and time again, even if that means missing out on seeing a new city. Savannah is like that for me, and there are many cities in Italy I'd revisit in a heartbeat. Last year, I went on a trip to Iceland and the old me wouldn't have wanted to go back again so soon, but I thought it was beautiful there and wanted to have more time, so I planned a trip for this summer. Mind you, due to a major back surgery, I had to cancel the trip, but still... When I told others of my plans to go back to Iceland again, most people understood, but a few others did question me, asking why I would want to go back there again when I could go anywhere else. When it came to traveling as a younger person, I was very ambitious and wanted to do as much as possible in as many countries as possible. There isn't anything wrong with traveling this way, but now I think more about the logistics, as in, "Is it worth it to spend the money on airfare just to stay there for a few days?" 

* My interest in domestic travel within my home country (USA) has grown. In my 20's, if given the choice to travel within the States or to travel internationally, I would have chosen the international trip, hands down. Since I've done the majority of my traveling overseas, I realized that I have skipped over many incredible sights and interesting places in the USA. That's why when Rachael brought up possibly traveling to Hawaii this February, I was game. There are so many places on my domestic bucket list now like: The Badlands, Alaska, Santa Fe, Seattle, Oregon, New England, Havasupai Falls, etc. 

* I would never, ever, EVER travel without travel insurance. In my 20's, I worked for three years in a foreign country and was provided with insurance through my employer. While that insurance was good in the country where I was living and working, when I traveled to other Asian countries, I had no idea if it was valid. I was young and healthy and thought I'd rather just pay out-of-pocket for healthcare instead of "wasting" money on insurance. When my back suddenly went completely out on a recent trip to Urumqi, I was in so much pain and was extremely worried about my health. The absolute last thing I even wanted to think about was the financial aspect of the whole situation. Luckily, my insurance will cover at least $15,000 of what I spent. You don't want to go into financial ruin or worse yet, be denied care because you cannot cover the costs! 

* I make more educated decisions, especially when it comes to how animals are treated. I had a chance to visit the Siberian Tiger Park in Harbin this year, but opted not to because of some questionable practices I'd read about that occurred at the park. In 2008, I did travel to Nepal and rode an elephant through Chitwan National Park. Would I do this now? No, because I know about the cruelty these animals are forced to endure. I'm not trying to sound preachy here, but merely want to reflect on how important doing a bit of research can be. 

* How good the nightlife is no longer factors into my decision to travel somewhere. Now I couldn't care less about the nightlife because it's not important to me. I care more about cultural attractions rather than if a place has a hopping bar scene. Of course, in my 20's, it's not that I ONLY cared about that, but sometimes I really did! 

* My preferences concerning accommodation are different. Even in my early 20's, I didn't really like staying in the large dorm rooms in hostels, but I would. Now that I'm in my 30's, I just can't! I'm more of a hotel, Air Bnb, or guesthouse kind of girl these days, but when I do stay in a hostel, I'd much rather pay more for a private room for me and my friends. The days of sharing rooms with strangers are hopefully behind me! I do value a good nights sleep a lot more! 

* I don't care about my looks...as much. I'm more concerned about whether or not I'm actually comfortable. I remember one time in Scotland, I wore these shoes that rubbed my feet raw but I suffered through the pain because I thought they looked good. Yeah, I don't like to wear trainers that much, but I'd gladly take them over blisters. I'm also totally cool with not wearing makeup in tropical climates. In Sri Lanka this year, I didn't even bother with it on most days. Now I'm all about comfort over fashion when I travel.

* I don't feel guilty for taking "me" time. Now my favorite part of traveling is that I try to make it a combination of taking in new sights and relaxing. I realized that chilling out plays an important role in my trips. In Iceland last summer, Rachael and I just spent an afternoon binge watching Season 1 of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and we didn't feel guilty for not being out at that exact moment exploring Iceland. We had a very fulfilling trip and got to see and do so much. Spending an afternoon like that made us feel rejuvenated and eager to be "on the go" the following day. 

* Technology has changed the way I travel. In my 20's, my travel buddies and I got around by using paper maps or by asking for directions. I didn't have a GPS or Google Maps to look at if I got lost. Since directions are not my strong suit, I guess I'm rather glad about these technological advances. Now when I travel, it's rare that I spend more than 2 days in a row without access to wifi, so I'm always connected, which is useful, especially if there were to be an emergency. Although I do love Instagram and other forms of social media, sometimes I do also miss the simpler times!

* I have to think more about my physical limitations. Some people in their 30's might be super healthy and this might not affect them, but for me, my back problems have and will hold me back from doing everything I would have done in my 20's. When I was in Koh Tao this year, my travel buddy Scott and I signed up to take diving lessons. On the first day, we had to assemble our equipment and I was struggling to carry it. Leaning over and putting everything together, really hurt my back a lot since I had a bad massage a few days before. I told Scott that I was just too wary to dive the next day and that I was out but he could feel free to go ahead and continue the course if he wanted. Because of my spinal fusion, I just don't think I will be doing things like riding horses or anything super crazy. I probably won't be getting any more back massages (lesson learned from Thailand), and I really have to try not to sit for extended periods of time. This might mean that I'll book myself some stopovers as a break between long flights or splurge on a business class seat to get the flat bed. 

What's your traveling style now? Has it always been like that or did you also change?

What I Learned From my Chinese Hospital Experience

May 27, 2016

So far I have been in a Chinese hospital for 27 days and counting. At times, it has been crazy. At other times it has been lonely or just plain stressful. I cannot deny that this insane experience has caused me reflect a lot on life...I mean, what else was I supposed to do seeing as how the first hospital I was at had no wifi and I had no books to read?!

What have I learned so far?

* I discovered how truly kind so many people in Xinjiang Province really are. Believe it or not, I made friends in the hospital I was staying at! A younger Uyghur doctor working there spoke English, so they sent him over to me to help translate. He came by several times a day to check on me. He told me I was his first and only foreign patient and that he was happy to have an opportunity to speak in English. We added each other on We Chat, and he told me that when I'm healed I have to come back to Xinjiang so that we can tour the area together. I also became friends with another woman there named Vicky. She was there to see her mom in the hospital, but when she would stop by to see her mom, she also would come and see me, even after I had to change rooms. One day, she couldn't see me, so she sent her husband in with lots of bananas for me.

On my first day at the hospital, I was all alone and had nothing to eat for breakfast because the hospital did not provide food. A woman saw that I didn't have anything and brought over part of her family's breakfast for me to have. I offered to pay her, but she told me not to be silly and that we were friends. Later on, I shared a room with a retired Chinese couple. They didn't even speak in English, but somehow we ended up having a conversation, and I found out that the man had the same exact back problem that I had! The couple was so sweet and they insisted on bringing me meals, even though at that point I could have had my friend in Urumqi ("C") bring me things to eat. I told them it really wasn't necessary, but they insisted. They ended up bringing me at least six home cooked meals and refused to accept any sort of payment. They just did it out of the goodness of their hearts, which meant a lot to me because I was seriously a total stranger to them.

Even my friend's friends really helped me out. Since I couldn't walk, I had to be carried over to have an MRI, and the staff at the hospital asked my friend if he could get some strong guys to lift me, so they came by to help me. My friends other friends bought me snacks, water, tissues, wipes, and other items I couldn't have done without. They helped translate my concerns to the doctors and just kept me company! I really am so grateful to them for giving up their time and spending it with me.

My friend C told me that one of his goals for the weekend was that he wanted to get me to like  Xinjiang so much that I would want to come back. It's funny because I had a terrible experience there because of my back, but despite all of that, I still left with a wonderful impression of Xinjiang. I would say that I have many reasons to return since I made some friends in the area, started to like the local culture and food, and of course, I never did get to go out and explore!

* I realized that anything can happen at any time. Of course, deep down, everyone knows this, but now I am much more aware of it. Also, I'm NEVER taking walking for granted again!

* When this all went down, I thought about how nice it would be if I had some Chinese friends to help me out. As sad as it is, I don't really have any Chinese friends in Shanghai with the exception of my co-teacher. I really want this to change!! C's Chinese friends were so awesome and nice, and I was thinking to myself that I was a little jealous and wanted some fabulous Chinese friends of my own. In past experiences living abroad, I was always able to make friends with the locals, but this year I have spent most of my time with the other foreign teachers. I do not want this to always be the case. Since I found out that I will be in Shanghai alone all summer, I'm hoping that I'll be able to somehow make at least one Chinese friend. I'll go to some sort of meet up if I have to, but I really do need to try harder. This situation was a wake up call for me in this area.

* I'm learning a lot more about the Chinese culture. Currently, I'm at a hospital in Shanghai and have to work daily with an ayi (caregiver) who doesn't know any English. I've even picked up a few more words and phrases in Chinese.

* I'm relieved that I was smart enough to make a savings account for an emergency because boy did I have one. When I can start earning money again, I'd like to double the amount in my savings account because this was a scary situation. I don't even want to think about what would have happened to me if I didn't have enough money to pay for this surgery.

* Even though I'm suffering a lot right now, in the grand scheme of things, I've been pretty lucky with my overall health. I will always have back problems, but at least I know I'll be able to recover from this. What about those who cannot? Or people with even more serious health problems? I give them mad props and would eventually like to do some volunteer work in this area.

* A tough situation like this has shown me who my friends really are. Yes, it's easy to be friends with someone when they are at their best and fun to be around, but unfortunately, life has those dark moments, too. During this time, I have been able to see who will truly be there for me. One of those people is Rachael. She was the one who signed for me when I had to have the surgery. Basically, she was in charge of consulting with my parents if something went wrong during the surgery. I really appreciate her doing that for me, especially since the person that should have done it for me didn't. For the most part, I realized that I have some damn good friends! Even people that I'm not close with have offered to come and visit or have sent me some get-well treats. There are two ratchet people that haven't even sent me one get well message, but you know what? I'm glad I know that's how they are and will steer clear of those two next year.

* I've come to see that the primary school I work for is pretty great, too. At a stressful moment in your life, the last thing you need is your employer giving you grief or trying to get you to find your own replacement. Thankfully, everything was taken care of for me and I've received nothing but support from the other first grade teachers, my principal, and my other co-workers.

* It could have been worse. Much, much worse. Like I said, I had C and his friends taking care of me in Xinjiang. Now that I'm back in Shanghai, my friends have been visiting me a lot here, and they bring me books, movies, food, and just spend time talking with me. Because of this hospital stay and surgery, I am not doing the best financially, but my dad lent me some money since the hospitals here don't take USD or my credit card from the States. The way my insurance works is that you have to pay everything up front, and then you can get reimbursed. Well, thank goodness my dad wired me $20,000 for this or I wouldn't have had enough in my savings to pay for everything. I was talking to some of the other teachers and they were saying that their parents didn't have that kind of money and would probably have to remortgage their house or take out loans. Also, the doctors here told me that this type of surgery is about $80,000 in the States. I'm not so sure about the exact cost, but I do know that it is cheaper here in China. I was also thinking about if this had happened over the summer because I was all set to travel in Morocco, Spain, and Iceland. It's better that it happened while I was already in China because I only have insurance through the school for the 10 month period of my contract. In July and August, I have a different kind of insurance since technically I'm not working for the school during that time. It would have cost me a lot more if it happened in July or August instead of when I was covered under the school's insurance because the insurance will cover about 75% of the total cost, I think.

* I discovered that I'm stronger than I thought I was. C, Rachael, and Scott have been telling me they've been impressed with how I've been handling this. Don't get me wrong, I did spent a night sobbing, "I'm in pain and I hate it here!" Overall, I think I have been pretty tough, especially considering I had never spent a night in the hospital before this. A lot of my friends told me that they would call their parents and beg them to come to China to take care of them, but I don't want to put that burden on my parents. I know that if I asked them to they would, but I think I can get through it on my own. After all, I am an adult. Throughout the course of my hospital stay, I had some painful tests and dealt with my back pain with minimal amounts of painkillers. I'm usually pretty humble, but I think I have to give credit where it's due and give myself a pat on the back for this one.

* I found out that hospitals are not restful places. The nurses keep telling me to rest, but goodness...between all the tests, the IVs, the visits from the doctors, my guests coming, and so on, I haven't been able to rest a lot at all. At the hospital in Urumqi it was worse because I had roommates. I'm very lucky now because I have a private room. Still, the ayi comes in ALL the time and hovers over me. It's so frustrating because it's so hard for me to fall asleep here and then when I finally do, she'll come in and rearrange something and wake me up! I've told a doctor to tell her to just leave me alone more, but that has not happened yet. In her mind, she thinks she is being helpful and doing her job.

* Independence is something that I truly value. I've always been the type of person who likes to do what I want, when I want. Because of my personality, it has been difficult working with my ayi. The ayi will try to do things for me that I can do for myself, and I find this irritating! She tries to brush my teeth and ermmm...wash me in places that I can wash myself. I have to wear a back brace if I sit up, and I need to be able to put it on by myself because that is what I will eventually have to do when I go back to my apartment, but she'll rip it out of my hands and roll me over so that she can do it for me. Sometimes I feel like I'm battling her, and anything that I CAN possibly do alone is something that I want to do on my own. The worst was the bathroom situation because I had to use a bedpan for three weeks, and she would put it away each time. When I had to go to the bathroom, I would have to buzz her, and I felt like a little kid having to ask permission to go! I really wanted her to just leave it out so that way I could go on my own, but even after I explained it to a nurse, it still didn't happen. I'm trying to be patient, but man is it going to be great when I can heal and do everything for myself again! I haven't had a real shower since May 1st, so the first one I have is going to be one of the best moments of my life!

* I learned to fall in love with reading all over again! I've never had this much spare time on my hands to just sit and read, and so I'm taking advantage of it. Thankfully, my wonderful friends brought me about 20 novels to read, so I'll probably be doing some book reviews here on my blog soon.

* I figured out that laughter truly is the best medicine. Two of my friends recently visited me and commented about how I was in good spirits, but I told them that I have to laugh and find happiness in this situation or else I will go insane! It's really important for me that my friends come here and we can all have fun together...otherwise, what do I have?

What have you learned during a difficult time in your life?

The Worst Experience of my Whole Life

May 25, 2016
What a great title for a post, huh? Probably my two biggest fears would be plummeting in a crashing plane and having an excruciating back problem to the point where I could not walk. More on that later.

Last year, I was faced with a tough decision about whether or not I should pursue an opportunity to teach in Shanghai, China. I was gung ho about taking a risk and having new adventures in Asia until I started experiencing some terrible back pain, which caused me to question my decision about whether or not I should actually go. I had a herniated disc, and after taking some oral steroids, going to physical therapy for over a month, and getting a steroid injection in my back, the pain finally became more bearable. After getting advice from two doctors who cleared me and encouraged me to go to China, I took a chance and finally moved to Shanghai.

Up until this point, I was having an amazing year professionally. I've been teaching for six years, and my current class is the best group of kids I've ever had the privilege of working with. We have fun together, they like learning, and their parents are very supportive. I have quite a few students with some dynamic personalities in my class, so there was never a dull moment. I couldn't have asked for more. I felt extremely lucky to find joy in my every day job and  truly grew to love and care about each individual student in my class.

My social life was pretty good, too. By "pretty good," I mean that I had enough time to have one! At our banquet at the beginning of the year, one of the directors said something along the lines of how we should work hard but that we deserve to play hard, too. I can say that I have no regrets and made the most of all of my time.

Living in Shanghai also allowed me to have a better quality of life than I would have had as a teacher in America. With more financial freedom, I found myself going on excursions in and around Shanghai, and spent many weekends exploring locally. I was also fortunate enough to be able to go on many trips within China and visited places such as: Yangshuo and Guilin, Harbin, and Xi'an. For our Chinese New Year break, I traveled outside of China to the Maldives, Sri Lanka, and to Koh Tao, Thailand. On top of everything else, I was able to pay off some more of my student loans. I guess you could say that besides having a good guy in my life, I had everything I ever dreamed of.

So, what about my back pain? Oddly enough, I had minimal pain after arriving in China and starting my new life. Even after six months, I had little to no pain and thought that my back problems were a thing of the past. The first time my back started hurting again was after a really bad Thai massage. Ironically, I thought that I was doing something GOOD for my back, but it's evident to me now that the masseuse really messed me up! Immediately following that massage, I could barely walk and my pal Scott had to assist me and put my shoes on for me. I had to rest in bed for several days afterwards. When I got back to China, I still was in pain, but as soon as I got back into my regular routine, the pain disappeared again. Then, about a month ago, I got out of bed and felt fine, but then I sneezed and that caused my back to go out. By "go out," I mean for that whole day, I could barely stand or walk and every little movement hurt so badly. This worried me, and I thought I was going to have to call of work the next day or go to the hospital. However, when I woke up the following day, I seemed to be much better and was more mobile, so I went to work. My condition improved the rest of the week, so I thought it was "just one of those things." A fluke.

A week after my back went out, I was to fly out to Xinjiang province in Eastern China. A friend of mine contacted me to let me know that he was in China, and the two of us made plans to meet. From now on, I'll just refer to this friend as "C." Anyway, C and I met while we were studying abroad in Besancon, France fourteen years ago, and we hadn't seen each other since! We had been messaging a lot, and we were all excited about finally being able to meet up again after more than a decade had passed. C had a great weekend planned for us, including a getaway to go hiking in the mountains.

After taking a five hour flight from Shanghai to Urumqi, C met me at the airport. I was a bit anxious to see him, but his easygoing nature made me feel comfortable right away. Our first stop was to go to this American football game that C had to be the referee for. It was raining, so the game had to move inside to a smaller space. I'm not someone who is really into football, but it was cool to see how competitive the players on each team got. While C was out on the field, I chatted with some of the Chinese girls who were there watching the game to support their boyfriends. I immediately noticed how friendly everyone was and how eager they were to talk to me.


After the game, we went back to C's place so that I could unpack my stuff, and then we headed out to a Uyghur restaurant to try some of the local food that is so famous throughout all of China. C was friends with the owners, and they just grabbed tons of meat and veggie skewers to grill up for us. After a delicious dinner and a few beers, we went back to C's place and hung out with two of his Chinese friends who were super fun! It's funny because one of his friends swears she learned how to speak English by watching American t.v. shows like Friends and How I Met Your Mother. She even named herself Rachel, after Jennifer Aniston's character. The four of us made a plan the next day to drive out to the mountains and to basically have like 5 meals. I guess eating and going for meal after meal is a big part of the local culture.


You're probably thinking that this sounds like a fun weekend so far and not at all like the worst experience of my life, but here's where things start to go awry. I woke up the next morning with a sore back and decided to take a shower and have some breakfast. C and I were talking, but then my back started to feel worse. I told him that I wanted to postpone climbing up a mountain for a few hours and to just rest a bit more to see if it got any better. Not only did my back NOT feel better, but it started feeling a million times worse. It got to the point where I couldn't even stand or walk. It was SO embarrassing to be at C's place and have to crawl to the bathroom. After a few more hours passed,   I knew there was no way I could go hiking, so I canceled that. I started considering going to the hospital at that point, but didn't even think I could walk out of C's apartment complex to get a taxi to take me there. Rachel ended up dialing 120, which is for emergencies in China. An ambulance arrived and the medics came up with a stretcher, but we realized that the stretcher couldn't fit in certain areas of C's apartment building, so that wasn't going to work. They had to go back to the hospital and bring a wheelchair.

You would think that they would've wheeled me into the ambulance, but instead C was in the ambulance and two nurses pushed me all the way to the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang. I don't even know how they managed since I probably weigh double what they did, and we were going over speed bumps and stuff.

When we got to the hospital, they told me that they were going to do a scan of my back and that I should plan on spending the night because they were going to administer two bags of medicine through an IV. The doctor was pretty confident that I would be feeling much better in the AM after receiving steroids. I was also hopeful that after I received the treatment that I would be on my merry way and could laugh about this story. Much to my dismay, my condition had not improved the following morning, as I still couldn't stand or walk. At that point, I had to contact the liaison at my school and let her know that I was probably not going to be back to work on Tuesday. The doctors then told me that they wanted me to check into the hospital because the problem was much more serious than they originally thought since the medicine they gave me did nothing. At that point, I was very concerned and physically exhausted. I couldn't sleep at all because the man next to me was screaming bloody murder all night. Later, I found out why and I can't say that I blame him. He had gotten stabbed in a nightclub!


I got placed into a room with eight other Chinese women in it already. Eight Chinese patients really means that no less than thirty people will be in your room because everyone has their family there taking care of them. There were also kids running in and out all day long, so it's very noisy. That's just how it is here. I also couldn't help but notice a large hole in the ceiling directly above my bed... It was really hard being in that hospital at first. My Chinese is limited, and none of the nurses could speak English.  Communication was a big problem and gestures could only get me so far. Another terrible aspect of my stay there was the lack of privacy. I think I'm a bit extreme when it comes to privacy, so to have to have none whatsoever was a big obstacle for me. I have a shy bladder and can't even go to the bathroom sometimes right away when a friend is in a stall next to me, and in my room, I had to use a bedpan in front of a room full of people. Also, it was terrible because there were a bunch of husbands in there visiting their wives. It's not like they were trying to look at me, but I just felt HIGHLY uncomfortable.



For the first three days in the hospital, I was exceptionally busy, and just felt really alone and frustrated. C had to go on a trip out of town for three days, which he felt bad about, but it just couldn't be avoided. Have I mentioned that C is fluent in Chinese? Having him there initially put me at ease, and I felt like he was kind of my advocate! He did send a few of his friends who spoke English and Chinese to look after me. Thank goodness they were nice enough to spend a day with me or I would have just been lost and would have starved. They didn't provide any food at the hospital I was at! If I didn't have C's friends to bring me food and toilet paper, I seriously would have gone crazy. Anyway, I had to have so many tests done when I first arrived. I was either being whisked away for a scan, an x-ray, and MRI, an EKG, or a sonogram or else I was getting poked and prodded. Have you ever had blood drawn from your artery from a girl who didn't seem to know what she was doing? After thirty minutes of pain, she gave up and then tried for the next day with no luck. Finally, after her third time trying, she got the sample.

They were also trying out other treatments on me. I had a lot of medicine through the IVs, heat therapy, acupuncture, and other types of Chinese medicine. Nothing worked. The doctor told me that judging from my MRI scan he didn't think those types of treatments would be effective, but that he had to follow a certain procedure before the next steps could be considered. I found out soon enough that "the next steps" meant prepping me for surgery. I had three herniated discs and part of the jelly-like substance from inside of the disc was directly pressing on my nerve, which is why I was unable to walk or stand. I also had a shooting pain radiating down my left leg from my back. My leg was extremely weak and numb in most parts. Compared to American hospitals,  in general, Chinese doctors are very stingy with the painkillers. I had to beg for a shot in the leg each night just to be able to sleep. The doctors told me that my spine was unstable so they wanted to fuse it together. This was a surgery that required 6 weeks of healing time. Again, this posed another huge problem for me because I was out in Xinjiang with only C as my main contact. My bosses at my school kept calling me and telling me to come back to Shanghai because I would have more people to take care of me, but they didn't have any plan in place for me. Like...where was I going to go once I arrived? You have to set these types of things up, as there is not always a bed available in the hospital you want to stay at. It's not like I could really have arranged it from a hospital bed in Urumqi without being able to speak Chinese. I also told them that there was no way I could physically fly back to Shanghai to have the surgery because I could not endure the flight. I couldn't even sit up or walk; how could I possibly travel for four hours on a plane? I was getting stressed out from them asking me to return when there was nothing set up for if I were to do so.

C thought that I should get a second opinion about whether or not I needed surgery and asked his doctor friend to help me out. She took my MRI scans and visited three different hospitals to see if the other doctors still said the same thing. Meanwhile, several people told my friend Scott that they had herniated discs and that I shouldn't get surgery. I had people messaging me left and right about how I shouldn't. I know that they were only trying to help, but that also really irritated me because they didn't know my full medical history and they aren't doctors themselves! Yes, not every herniated disc will require surgery. I should know that since last year I had a herniated disc and was able to get it treated without surgery, but this time I knew it was different. I'm not a doctor, but on my MRI scan there was a huge piece of my disc in my nerve! It was clear as day to me that I needed to have it removed in order to be able to walk again. C's doctor friend got back to me, and she said that all three doctors she had spoken with said the same thing--surgery was necessary. I was in really low spirits because of course I didn't want to have an invasive surgery like that away from home and away from the city I currently live in. I just felt like it was my only option, so I ended up saying that I would stay in Urumqi to have the surgery. The chief of staff would operate on me, I knew the price, and I knew the recovery time. I considered just hiring an ayi (caregiver) to help me get food and with daily tasks I would not be able to perform.

Here is what hit me the hardest about this whole thing...I was alone in Urumqi besides for C. I couldn't effectively communicate with the hospital staff. I felt like I was trapped in Urumqi since I wasn't strong enough to fly back to Shanghai. I was worried about the financial aspect of everything. I wasn't even sure whether or not the hospital I was staying at was covered by my school's insurance. The recovery time was no joke and quite lengthy, and there are always risks involved with any surgery. A big risk of back surgery is paralysis, not to mention the pain I would experience after the surgery took place. I didn't have enough RMB to pay for the surgery and the only way I knew how to get USD to RMB was to be physically present at my bank in Shanghai with my passport. I also felt terrible that I wasn't there to teach my students...I know that this is beyond my control, but I was looking forward to finishing out the year with them. Finally, I was gutted to have to cancel my summer trip to Morocco, Spain, and Iceland with Scott. We pre-booked almost everything, so we both lost a lot in cancellation fees. I also found out that I would not be able to fly back home to the States for the summer to see my family. It was going to be the first time that all of us were together again since my grandma passed away years ago. My friends will all leave China this summer to travel and to go home, so I'm going to be here alone and will not be able to fly out of China again until Chinese New Year next year (February 2017.) When I think about that, I get a little sick to my stomach because who wants to be in pain without any friends or family around to help them?

Even though this has been a trying time for me, there was nothing that could be done. It's not like I was out doing something irresponsible and injured my back in that way. It just happened, and as bad as it is for me to go through this, I am keenly aware that it could have been much worse. Although this situation is far from ideal, I'm counting my blessings and hope that this situation will make me stronger. I will never take being able to walk for granted again and am much more compassionate to others with chronic pain. Having this surgery is inevitable, so now it's time to suck it up and heal because that's all I can really do.

Have you ever had a severe injury and how did you cope?

5 Useful Apps

May 18, 2016

I always love it when other bloggers share their favorite apps, so I thought I'd mention some apps that have come in handy for me lately.

1) Cuda Sign If you find yourself frequently signing documents that have to be returned to another party, this app might be right for you. At my school, I have to sign my pay stubs each month as well as a variety of other documents here and there. I don't always have time to make a special trip across campus and hand in a signed, paper copy of these documents, so that's where Cuda Sign comes in. It's easy to use the app to open the document that requires your signature. Then, simply use your finger to sign your name. You have the option to insert the date, if you wish. Once that's done, you can use the app the e-mail the document right away. This app has really saved me a lot of time and I'm sure I'll be using it a lot next year, too.

2) Tiny Scanner I can't say I enjoy fumbling around with a scanner, and on top of that, the school I work for doesn't even have a scanner for me to use. That's why I was a bit worried when I had to scan a whole bunch of items for my trip to the Maldives. When a friend suggested that I download this app, all of my problems were solved. It's easy to just take a picture of what I need to have scanned, and then this app makes it right into .pdf file for you. Directly from the app, you are able to save it as a photo on your camera roll, add it to Evernote, or e-mail it out, to name a few options.

3) IF by IFTT This app is popular among bloggers, and I can see why. It makes it so easy to connect different social media accounts by using "recipes." I use this app to connect my Instagram to my Twitter and to my blog's Facebook page, but there are hundreds of different recipes to be made with various platforms like: Pinterest, Blogger, Buffer, Evernote, and Gmail.

4) Relax Melodies Do sounds found in nature help you to relax while working or when trying to sleep? Personally, when it's time for me to get stuff done, I cannot listen to music with lyrics. It's not that I don't enjoy the songs...quite the opposite. I like the songs too much and then stop and listen to the lyrics or sing along instead of fully focusing on my work. Thankfully, with Relax Melodies, I am able to just play instrumental music. It's ideal for me because my apartment building can get a bit noisy and so it helps to drown out those other sounds. Of course, I also use it at night time because I live right across from the boys' dormitory, and they can get pretty rowdy. It's far more pleasurable to hear soothing sounds like rain falling, wind chimes, or rivers than it is to hear a bunch of screaming students!

5) XE Currency If you travel to a foreign country, dealing with calculating the exchange rates can take a bit of time to get used to. With XE Currency, you can put in your home country, and then the app uses information about your current location to convert amounts in the local currency into the currency that you are familiar with. The cool thing about this app is that you don't have to be connected to the internet to use it! If you can't connect, the app just uses the latest rates that were available when you were last connected. I plan on using this app the next time I visit a country outside of the U.S. and China.

What apps are you finding useful at the moment?