Bottling Wine

January 7, 2014
Previously I posted on here about how I met my good friends Jeff and Ga Yeon in Akron at The Grape and Granary in order to make two batches of wine.  In case you missed that post, and are interested, check it out here.  After we made the wine, we had to wait at least four weeks for it to ferment.  When our time waiting was up, we booked a bottling session.  The bottles at the winery are available to purchase and ranged in price from $0.79 to $1.79, depending on the type of bottle.  My friends had been saving their wine bottles and brought them in so that they didn't have to pay the fee.  I saved some bottles, but found it was a serious pain to get the labels off even after soaking the bottles for hours.  I decided that I would just go ahead and pay for them because it was taking forever and not worth my time.  I did find some helpful tips on how to remove the labels on Winemaker's Academy's site, so I will try these out next time because I probably don't want to have to buy the bottles a second time should we return and make another batch in the future.

The first thing we had to do was sanitize all of the bottles that Jeff and Ga Yeon brought in with them.  The provided us with a sanitation "tree" so that we could do this.  Once we were done sanitizing the bottles, we placed them on the "tree" to dry.


Next, the large jugs of wine that we had previously made were brought out.  One end of a tube was placed into the jug and the other end of it was connected to a machine that was used to fill the bottles with the wine.  We decided to create an assembly line, and Jeff was in charge of filling up our bottles.  We used the clear bottles for our white wine and the green ones for our red wine, which is the traditional way to bottle wine.  The dark green glass helps keep out UV light.  When red wine is exposed to UV light for a prolonged period, the flavor of the wine could potentially be damaged.


I was in charge of working the corker, which I found pretty fun.  :)  I just grabbed the bottle and put it in the machine, added a cork, closed the door, and it worked its magic.


Jeff started adding the foil coverings to the bottles and Ga Yeon took over filling the bottles.


There was some wine left over, but it wasn't enough to fill a full bottle, so we took a little break and sampled it.  Then, we designed the labels for our wine.  On our first wine-making visit we were given a little brochure full of all the different labels to pick from.  Ga Yeon and Jeff picked out their favorite ones and I narrowed it down from there.  We decided that we wanted our red and white wine to have two different labels and also had to come up with a name for both types of wine we made.  We went with the name "Seoul" for our red wine because that is where the three of us all met.  We opted to name the white wine "Chingu" which means friend in Korean.



After attaching the labels, we relaxed with some more wine and were all set!  We did this before the holidays, and it was great timing because I gave away several bottles of wine for Christmas gifts since I left the winery with almost 20 bottles.  Everyone I gave the wine to seemed to think it was so cool that we made the wine ourselves, and when you name your wine "friend" it's the ideal present to give away to friends.

  

What would you name your wine if you decided to make some?
12 comments on "Bottling Wine"
  1. Lovely look!
    http://afinaskaterblogspotcom.blogspot.ru/

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  2. This sounds like such a fun process! I liked the fact about why different types of wine are put in different bottles - that's not something I had thought about before. I would definitely consider doing this in the future!

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    1. I never knew the reasoning behind it, either! I would like to do this again when I'm running low on good wine.

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  3. I have made beer but I have not tried to make wine. I wonder if any wineries near me offer classes (SF Bay Area near Napa and other wine growing regions). Seems like a great activity to do with friends or a date!

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    1. It was a ton of fun and we got to make two trips to the winery for it, and that is always okay in my book. :)

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  4. Chingu is such a great name for a wine! Very thoughtful. I would probably just pick something stupid and absurd, like "Laserpants". Nothing sounds more refined than Laserpants. Now I sort of want to try my hand at homebrewing beer and giving it a weird name.

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    1. Hahaha...I wonder how Laserpants wine would taste. That would be a good conversation starter for sure! "Do you want to try my Laserpants wine? I made it!"

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  5. this is such a great idea and looks super fun. and since i'm half-Korean, I love the names you picked!!
    -- jackie @ jade and oak

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    1. I didn't know you were half-Korean! Have you ever visited Korea before?? One of the girls I taught with was half Korean and she got to meet a lot of her relatives while she was over there.

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  6. That looks like so much fun, I didn't know places like that existed.
    clarkmurdock.blogspot.com

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    1. They sure do! I made wine another time in Columbus with my sister and her friends. It was a much larger group, so I only got a few bottles, but it was still a fun outing.

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  7. This looks like so much fun I love wine!! I have no idea what I would name my wine but I would have to think of something creative! I have been wine tasting numerous times and had a lot of fun. Thanks for commenting on my makeup look, so glad you liked it ps. It was done by a professional (me), aside from working as a therapist I also do freelance makeup work! In fact this weekend I did a bridal party :) learning new things about each other every day!

    -Erica

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